GENERAL
The Municipality of Savukoski was established by a decree of Finland’s Imperial Senate in 1916. The municipality is 6 470 km² in size, and the total population is nowadays about 1300, which makes Savukoski Finland's most sparsely settled community (0.25 residents / km²). Settlement is concentrated on the southern part of the municipality. The land area of Savukoski is an extensive wilderness where individual fells rise imposingly over the surrounding environs. The Korvatunturi Fell - located on the Finnish-Russian border – is the most famous because it is the home of Santa Claus. The forest areas are still prominent despite massive logging, which has allowed about 1/3 of the land area to be preserved as nature reserves.

Abundance of marshlands and rivers is characteristic of the region, largest of the waterways being the Kemijoki River, which flows through the entire municipality. The Tuulomajoki watershed in the northern reaches of the municipality disposes its waters into the Arctic Ocean.

The municipality’s economy is distributed as follows: raw materials production is 42%, processed products 5% while the service sector comprises a share of 51%. The forestry sector has undergone a profound transition during the 1980s and 1990s as a result of the mechanization of logging methods. At the same time, employment in farming has decreased. Reindeer husbandry, however, remains an important means of livelihood -- the Kemi-Sompio Reindeer Herders Association, located largely in the municipality, is the biggest in Finland. Reindeer husbandry is a major source of income for approximately 200 full- and part-time reindeer breeders.

The diversification of economy and the increased focus on tourism has given growth to a number of local projects, such as “Savukoski-Tuntsa”, whose aim has been to streamline the marketing of local tourist services. Another project, “Business From The Environment Of KorvatunturinMaa”, has investigated ways for marketing and creating products made of natural materials or those which are directly derived from nature. In addition, the municipality is investigating the means of working and processing timber locally.

A large phosphate deposit (over 100 million tons) was discovered at Sokli in 1967. The phosphate is premium grade quality with a high phosphorus content, which makes it highly suitable for the fertilizer industry. Presently, Kemira GrowHow owns the extraction license for the site. The opening of the Salla border cross point to international traffic may also have an effect on Savukoski's future prospects.

The municipality’s service sector is up-to-date, and all basic services can be offered even to a larger population than presently. Space for establishing commercial and industrial enterprises is available as well as moderately priced residential housing and building lots. A primary school and a high school are located in the municipal center.

Savukoski's sister communities are Överkalix in Northern Sweden , Iszkaszentgyörgy in Hungary and the village of Jona in Kola Peninsula, Russia.

For travel information go to travel.savukoski.fi

 
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Hae sivustolta